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Professor
Andre Pascal Kengne

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Dr Moses Egesa

Associate Professor Yaya Kassogue

Associate professor in Genetic and Molecular Pathology

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Dr Moses Egesa

Dr Zivai Nenguke

Project Director

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Dr Moses Egesa

Ms Emily Awuor Abuonji

RESEARCH ASSISTANT

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Current Organisation

South African Medical Research Council

Current Job Title

Director, Non-Communicable Diseases Research Unit

Biography

Publications

Authors:
Kengne AP Libend CN Dzudie A Menanga A Dehayem MY Kingue S Sobngwi E

Journal:
The Pan African medical journal

Content:

Date:
2014-10-01

Authors:
Pheiffer C Erasmus RT Kengne AP Matsha TE

Journal:
Clinical biochemistry

Content:

Date:
2015-12-01

Authors:
Yako YY Madubedube JH Kengne AP Erasmus RT Pillay TS Matsha TE

Journal:
African health sciences

Content:

Date:
2015-12-01

Authors:
Kufe NC Masemola M Chikowore T Kengne AP Olsson T Goedecke JH Micklesfield LK

Journal:
BMJ open

Content:

Date:
2019-01-01

Authors:
GACD Hypertension Research Programme Writing Group Peiris D Thompson SR Beratarrechea A Cárdenas MK Diez-Canseco F Goudge J Gyamfi J Hypertension Research Programme members

Journal:
Implementation science : IS

Content:

Date:
2015-11-01

Authors:
Cindy George Tandi E Matsha Saarah FG Davids Gloudina M Hon U Chikte Rajiv T Erasmus Andre P Kengne

Journal:
South African Dental Journal

Content:

Date:
2022-03-08

Authors:
Kaze FF Ashuntantang G Kengne AP Hassan A Halle MP Muna W

Journal:
Hemodialysis international. International Symposium on Home Hemodialysis

Content:

Date:
2012-04-01

Authors:
Nouya AY Nansseu JR Moor VJ Pieme CA Noubiap JJ Tchoula CM Mokette BM Takam RD Tankeu F Ngogang JY Kengne AP

Journal:
Diabetes research and clinical practice

Content:

Date:
2014-10-01

Authors:
Kengne AP Dzudie A Dongmo L

Journal:
Neuroepidemiology

Content:

Date:
2006-10-01

Authors:
Mazidi M Heidari-Bakavoli A Khayyatzadeh SS Azarpazhooh MR Nematy M Safarian M Esmaeili H Parizadeh SM Ghayour-Mobarhan M Kengne AP Ferns GA

Journal:
European journal of clinical nutrition

Content:

Date:
2016-09-01

Authors:
Werfalli M Raubenheimer PJ Engel M Musekiwa A Bobrow K Peer N Hoegfeldt C Kalula S Kengne AP Levitt NS

Journal:
Systematic reviews

Content:

Date:
2020-06-01

Authors:
Andre Pascal Kengne Eugene Sobngwi Leopold Fezeu Paschal Kum Awah Sylvestre Dongmo

Journal:

Content:
Setting-up nurse-led pilot clinics for the management of non-communicable diseases at primary health care level in resource-limited settings of Africa

Date:

Authors:
Nong-Libend C Menanga AP Kengne AP Dehayem M Sobngwi E Kingue S

Journal:
Diabetes & metabolism

Content:

Date:
2012-05-01

Authors:
Echouffo-Tcheugui JB Kengne AP Ali MK

Journal:
Current diabetes reports

Content:

Date:
2018-09-01

Authors:
Kaze FF Meto DT Halle MP Ngogang J Kengne AP

Journal:
BMC nephrology

Content:

Date:
2015-07-01

Authors:
Theodosia Adom Anniza De Villiers Thandi Puoane André Pascal Kengne

Journal:

Content:
Abstract Background There is limited data on risk factors associated with childhood overweight and obesity in Ghanaian school children. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of overweight and obesity and associated risk factors in Ghanaian school children. Methods Data for this study were obtained from a cross-sectional survey of 543 children aged 8 and 11 years, attending private and public primary schools in the Adentan Municipality of Greater Accra Region, Ghana. Anthropometric, dietary, physical activity, sedentary behaviours, sleep duration and socio-demographic data were collected. BMI-for-age Z-scores were used to classify children as overweight/obesity. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to assess the determinants of overweight and obesity. Results The overall prevalence of overweight/obesity was 16.4%. Children living in middle (OR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.01–3.50) and high socioeconomic status (SES) households (2.58; 1.41–4.70) had increased odds of being overweight or obese compared to those living in low SES household. Attending private school (2.44; 1.39–4.29) and watching television for more than 2 h each day (1.72; 1.05–2.82) were significantly associated with increased likelihood of overweight and obesity. Children who slept for more than 9 h a night (0.53; 0.31–0.88) and walked or cycled to school (0.51; 0.31–0.82) had lower odds of being overweight or obese. Conclusions A number of modifiable risk factors were associated with overweight and obesity in this study. Public health strategies to prevent childhood obesity should target reduction in television watching time, promoting active transport to and from school, and increasing sleep duration.

Date:
2019-01-01

Authors:
Mbanya V Hussain A Kengne AP

Journal:
Primary care diabetes

Content:

Date:
2015-05-01

Authors:
Pule GD Ngo Bitoungui VJ Chetcha Chemegni B Kengne AP Wonkam A

Journal:
Hemoglobin

Content:

Date:
2016-11-01

Authors:
Feigin VL Krishnamurthi RV Parmar P Norrving B Mensah GA Bennett DA Barker-Collo S Moran AE Sacco RL Truelsen T Davis S Pandian JD GBD 2013 Stroke Panel Experts Group

Journal:
Neuroepidemiology

Content:

Date:
2015-10-01

Authors:
Kengne AP Sobngwi E Echouffo-Tcheugui JB Mbanya JC

Journal:
Heart (British Cardiac Society)

Content:

Date:
2013-05-01

Authors:
Mazidi M Kengne AP Sahebkar A Banach M

Journal:
Angiology

Content:

Date:
2017-06-01

Authors:

Journal:
International journal of epidemiology

Content:
BACKGROUND: As the relation between socioeconomic status (SES) and obesity may depend on the stage of development of a country, this relation is assessed in adults from urban Cameroon. METHODS: A sample comprising 1530 women and 1301 men aged 25 years and above, from 1897 households in the Biyem-Assi health area in the capital of Cameroon, Yaoundé, were interviewed about their household amenities, occupation, and education. Weight, height, and waist circumference were measured and subjects were classified as obese if their BMI>or=30 kg/m2 or overweight if BMI was between 25.0 and 29.9 kg/m2. Abdominal obesity was defined by a waist circumference>or=80 cm in women and>or=94 cm in men. RESULTS: Of the sample studied 33% of women and 30% of men were overweight (P<0.08), whereas 22% of women and 7% of men were obese (P<0.001). Abdominal obesity was present in 67% of women and 18% of men (P<0.001). After adjusting for age, leisure time physical activity, alcohol consumption, and tobacco smoking, the prevalence of overweight+obesity, obesity, and abdominal obesity increased with quartiles of household amenities in both genders and with occupational level in men. CONCLUSION: SES is positively associated with adiposity in urban Cameroon after adjusting for confounding factors.

Date:
2005-10-28

Authors:
Marie Patrice Halle Gloria Ashuntantang Francois Folefack Kaze Christian Takongue Andre-Pascal Kengne

Journal:
BMC Nephrology

Content:

Date:
2016-12-01

Authors:
GBD 2017 Oesophageal Cancer Collaborators

Journal:
The lancet. Gastroenterology & hepatology

Content:

Date:
2020-04-01

Authors:
Boateng D Agyemang C Beune E Meeks K Smeeth L Schulze M Addo J de-Graft Aikins A Galbete C Bahendeka S Danquah I Agyei-Baffour P Klipstein-Grobusch K

Journal:
Circulation. Cardiovascular quality and outcomes

Content:

Date:
2017-11-01

Authors:
Matsha TE Hartnick MD Kisten Y Eramus RT Kengne AP

Journal:
Journal of diabetes

Content:

Date:
2013-10-01

Authors:
Mazidi M Kengne AP George ES Siervo M

Journal:
The British journal of nutrition

Content:

Date:
2019-08-01

Authors:
Katte JC Dzudie A Sobngwi E Mbong EN Fetse GT Kouam CK Kengne AP

Journal:
BMC public health

Content:

Date:
2014-07-01

Authors:
Alain Lekoubou Clovis Nkoke Anastase Dudzie Andre Pascal Kengne

Journal:

Content:
Background: Despite the increasing availability of head computerized tomography (CT) in resource-limited settings, it is unclear if brain-imaging-based diagnosis of stroke affects the outcomes in the absence of dedicated structures for acute stroke management. Objectives: In a major referral hospital in the capital city of Cameroon, we compared in-hospital mortality rates in patients with a WHO-based diagnosis of stroke between participants with and without brain imaging on admission. Methods: Stroke patients with and without admission brain imaging were compared for demographic characteristics, risk factors, clinical and laboratory characteristic, and in-hospital mortality. Heterogeneities in mortality rates (CT vs. No CT) across major subgroups were investigated via interaction tests, and logistic regressions used to adjust for extraneous factors such as age, sex, year of study, residency, history of diabetes and hypertension, history of stroke, Glasgow coma scale, and delay between stroke symptoms onset and hospital admission. Results: Of the 1688 participants included in the final analysis, 1048 (62.1%) had brain imaging. The median age of the non-CT vs. CT groups was 65 vs. 62 years (p-value < 0.0001%). The death rate of non-CT vs. CT groups was 27.5% vs. 16.4% (p < 0.0001). This difference was mostly similar across major subgroups, and robust to the adjustments for confounders (in spite of substantial attenuation), with excess deaths in those with CT ranging from 65% to 149%. Conclusion: In this resource-limited environment, the absence of brain imaging on admission was associated with high in-hospital death from stroke, which was only partially explained by delayed hospitalization with severe disease. These results stressed the importance of scaling up acute stroke management in low- and middle-income countries.

Date:
2016-01-01

Authors:
Pefura Yone EW Kuaban C Kengne AP

Journal:
BMC infectious diseases

Content:

Date:
2012-08-01

Authors:
Zemlin AE Matsha TE Kengne AP Hon GM Erasmus RT

Journal:
Annals of clinical biochemistry

Content:

Date:
2016-09-01

Authors:
Engel ME Cohen K Gounden R Kengne AP Barth DD Whitelaw AC Francis V Badri M Stewart A Dale JB Mayosi BM Maartens G

Journal:
The Pediatric infectious disease journal

Content:

Date:
2017-03-01

Authors:
GBD 2017 Inflammatory Bowel Disease Collaborators

Journal:
The lancet. Gastroenterology & hepatology

Content:

Date:
2019-10-01

Authors:
Mohsen Mazidi Andre Pascal Kengne Hassan Vatanparast

Journal:
Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity

Content:

Date:
2017-01-01

Authors:
Uthman OA Nduka C Watson SI Mills EJ Kengne AP Jaffar SS Clarke A Moradi T Ekström AM Lilford R

Journal:
BMC infectious diseases

Content:

Date:
2018-06-01

Authors:
NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (NCD-RisC)

Journal:
Nature

Content:

Date:
2019-05-01

Authors:
Steve Raoul Ngongang Noumegni Jobert Richie Nansseu Vicky Jocelyne Moor Ama Jean Joel Bigna Felix Kembe Assah Magellan Guewo-Fokeng Steve Leumi Jean-Claude Katte Mesmin Dehayem Andre Pascal Kengne Eugene Sobngwi

Journal:

Content:
Abstract Background Little is known on the magnitude and correlates of insulin resistance in HIV-infected people in Africa. We determined the prevalence of insulin resistance and investigated associated factors in HIV-infected adult Cameroonians. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study at the Yaoundé Central Hospital, Cameroon; during which we enrolled HIV-infected people aged 30 to 74 years with no previous history of cardiovascular disease. An homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) like index served to assess insulin sensitivity with insulin resistance defined by values of 2.1 or higher. Results We included 452 patients (20% men). Their mean age was 44.4 ± 9.8 years and 88.5% of them were on antiretroviral therapy (93.3% on first line regimen including Zidovudine, lamivudine and Efavirenz/Nevirapine). Of all participants, 28.5% were overweight, 19.5% had obesity and 2.0% had diabetes. The prevalence of insulin resistance was 47.3% without any difference between patients on ART and those ART-naïve (48.5% vs. 38.5%; p = 0.480). Obesity was the only factor independently associated with insulin resistance (adjusted odds ratio: 2.28; 95% confidence interval: 1.10–4.72). Conclusion Insulin resistance is present in nearly half of HIV-infected patients in Cameroon despite a low prevalence rate of diabetes, and is associated with obesity.

Date:
2017-01-01

Authors:
Andre Pascal Kengne Anushka Patel

Journal:

Content:

Date:
2006-01-01

Authors:
Kuguyo O Kengne AP Dandara C

Journal:
Omics : a journal of integrative biology

Content:

Date:
2020-06-01

Authors:
Mohsen Mazidi Andre Pascal Kengne Dimitri P. Mikhailidis Arrigo F. Cicero Maciej Banach

Journal:

Content:
Abstract ; Background and aim: Growing evidence suggests that some of the effects of diet on cardiovascular disease (CVD) occur through mechanisms involving subclinical inflammation. We assessed the relationship between selected dietary constituents and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentration in a population-based sample of United States adults. Methods: In this cross-sectional analysis, participants were selected from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and restricted to those with available data on dietary intake, biochemical and anthropometric measurements from 2001 to 2010. All statistical analyses accounted for the survey design and sample weights by using SPSS Complex Samples v22.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). Results: Of the 17,689 participants analysed, 8607 (48.3%) were men. The mean age was 45.8 years in the overall sample, 44.9 in men and 46.5 in women ( p = .047). The age-, race-, sex-, energy intake- and body mass index-adjusted mean dietary intakes of total dietary fibre, polyunsaturated fatty-acids, vitamin E, vitamin A, vitamin B6, total folate, vitamin B family, vitamin C, vitamin K, magnesium, iron, copper and potassium monotonically decreased across increasing hsCRP quarters ( p < .001 for all), whereas sugar intake increased ( p < .001). In analysis of covariance adjusted for potential confounders (age-, race-, sex-, energy intake- and body weight-) hsCRP levels increased across increasing quarters of sugar intake ( p < .001). Conclusions: This study provides further evidence of an association between dietary sugar, polyunsaturated fatty-acids, fibre and antioxidant intake and hsCRP levels, a subclinical inflammation marker. hsCRP concentrations are likely modulated by dietary intake.KEY MESSAGES Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentration is positively associated with sugar intake, and negatively with the consumption of minerals, vitamins and polyunsaturated fatty-acids (fruit and vegetables). hsCRP concentrations, and accordingly subclinical inflammation, are likely influenced by dietary intake. Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentration is positively associated with sugar intake, and negatively with the consumption of minerals, vitamins and polyunsaturated fatty-acids (fruit and vegetables). hsCRP concentrations, and accordingly subclinical inflammation, are likely influenced by dietary intake.

Date:
2017-01-01

Authors:
Dzudie A Rayner B Ojji D Schutte AE Twagirumukiza M Damasceno A Ba SA Kane A Kramoh E Anzouan Kacou JB Onwubere B Cornick R Sliwa K PASCAR Task Force on Hypertension

Journal:
Global heart

Content:

Date:
2017-10-01

Authors:
Balti EV Kengne AP Fokouo JVF Nouthé BE Sobngwi E

Journal:
PloS one

Content:

Date:
2013-12-01

Authors:
Chalmers J Kengne AP Joshi R Perkovic V Patel A

Journal:
Journal of hypertension. Supplement : official journal of the International Society of Hypertension

Content:

Date:
2007-06-01

Authors:
Kim Anh Nguyen Naeemah Abrahams Rachel Jewkes Shibe Mhlongo Soraya Seedat Bronwyn Myers Carl Lombard Claudia Garcia-Moreno Esnat Chirwa Andre Pascal Kengne Nasheeta Peer

Journal:
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Content:

Date:
2022-03-29

Authors:
Moloi MW Kajawo S Noubiap JJ Mbah IO Ekrikpo U Kengne AP Bello AK Okpechi IG

Journal:
BMJ open

Content:

Date:
2018-05-01

Authors:
Lekoubou A Philippeau F Derex L Olaru A Gouttard M Vieillart A Kengne AP

Journal:
Neurological research

Content:

Date:
2013-12-01

Authors:
Matsha TE Hassan MS Hon GM Soita DJ Kengne AP Erasmus RT

Journal:
International journal of cardiology

Content:

Date:
2013-05-01

Authors:
Matsha TE Kengne AP Masconi KL Yako YY Erasmus RT

Journal:
BMC genetics

Content:

Date:
2015-06-01

Authors:
Matsha TE Yako YY Rensburg MA Hassan MS Kengne AP Erasmus RT

Journal:
BMC nephrology

Content:

Date:
2013-04-01

Authors:
Mazidi M Shivappa N Wirth MD Hebert JR Kengne AP

Journal:
European journal of clinical nutrition

Content:

Date:
2018-11-01

Authors:
Eric Walter Pefura-Yone André Pascal Kengne Emmanuel Afane-Ze Christopher Kuaban

Journal:

Content:
Background German cockroach or Blattella germanica is commonly found in homes across the inter-tropical region. The contribution of sensitisation to Blattella germanica in people with asthma in sub-Saharan Africa has not received attention. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and investigate the predicting factors of sensitisation to Blattella germanica in patients with asthma in Yaounde, Cameroon.Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted between January 2012 and June 2013. All patients (aged 15 years and above) with asthma, receiving care at the Yaounde Jamot Hospital and the CEDIMER medical practice during the study period and who had received a prick skin testing for perennial aeroallergens were included in the study.Results The final sample comprised 184 patients including 123 (66.8%) women. The median age (25th-75th percentiles) was 38 (24–54) years. Prick skin test for Blattella germanica was positive in 47 (25.5%) patients. Sensitisation to Blattella germanica was associated with a sensitisation to mite in 41 (87.2%) patients, a sensitisation to Alternaria in 18 (38.3%) patients, and a sensitisation to cat or dog dander in 7 (14.9%) patients. Independent predicting factors of a sensitisation to Blattella germanica were the sensitisation to Blomia tropicalis [adjusted odd ratio (95% confidence interval) 4.10 (1.67-10.04), p = 0.002] and sensitisation to Alternaria [3.67 (1.53-7.46), p = 0.003].Conclusions Sensitisation to Blattella germanica is present in about a quarter of adult patients with asthma in Yaounde. Sensitisation to Alternaria and Blomia tropicalis appears to be a powerful predicting factor of sensitisation to Blattella germanica in this setting. Keywords: Asthma, Blattella, Allergy, Aeroallergens, Africa

Date:

Authors:
Eric Walter Pefura-Yone Emmanuel Soh André Pascal Kengne Adamou Dodo Balkissou Christopher Kuaban

Journal:

Content:
Summary: Purpose: To assess the prevalence and determinants of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) as well as the concordance of two screening criteria in a major center for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment in Yaounde, Cameroon. Methods: In 2011, we conducted a cross-sectional study involving a random sample of 889 adults (age > 18 years, 67.9% women) infected with HIV who were receiving chronic care at the Yaounde Jamot Hospital. Adherence was assessed via self-administered questionnaires using the Community Programs for Clinical Research on AIDS (CPCRA) index and the Center for Adherence Support Evaluation (CASE) index. Results: The prevalence of non-adherence to ART was 22.5% based on the CPCRA index and 34.9% based on the CASE index, with a low agreement between the two indexes [kappa = 0.37 (95% confidence interval 0.31–0.44)]. Independent determinants of CPCRA-diagnosed non-adherence were as follows: being a remunerated employee [odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 1.61 (1.14–2.28)], Pentecostal Christianity [2.18 (1.25–3.80)], alcohol consumption [1.65 (1.16–2.34)] and non-adherence to cotrimoxazole prophylaxis [5.73 (3.92–8.38)]. The equivalents for CASE-diagnosed non-adherence were [1.59 (1.19–2.12)], [1.83 (1.36–2.47)], [1.70 (1.27–2.28)], respectively, in addition to association with changes to the ART regimen [1.61 (1.17–2.20)]. Conclusions: Non-adherence to ART remains high in this population. The careful evaluation of patients for the presence of determinants of non-adherence identified in this study may aid ART optimization. Keywords: Antiretroviral therapy, Adherence, HIV infection, Cameroon

Date:
2013-01-01

Authors:
Riddell MA Edwards N Thompson SR Bernabe-Ortiz A Praveen D Johnson C Kengne AP Liu P McCready T Ng E Nieuwlaat R Ovbiagele B Owolabi M GACD Hypertension Research Programme

Journal:
Globalization and health

Content:

Date:
2017-03-01

Authors:
GBD 2017 Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease Collaborators

Journal:
The lancet. Gastroenterology & hepatology

Content:

Date:
2020-03-01

Authors:
Igwesi-Chidobe CN Godfrey EL Kengne AP

Journal:
BMJ open

Content:

Date:
2015-08-01

Authors:
Ataklte F Erqou S Kaptoge S Taye B Echouffo-Tcheugui JB Kengne AP

Journal:
Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979)

Content:

Date:
2014-11-01

Authors:
Wang H Liddell CA Coates MM Mooney MD Levitz CE Schumacher AE Apfel H Iannarone M Phillips B Lofgren KT Sandar L Dorrington RE Rakovac I Murray CJ

Journal:
Lancet (London, England)

Content:

Date:
2014-05-01

Authors:
Odukoya OO Ohazurike C Akanbi M O'Dwyer LC Isikekpei B Kuteyi E Ameh IO Osadiaye O Adebayo K Usinoma A Adewole A Odunukwe N Okuyemi K Kengne AP

Journal:
JMIR mHealth and uHealth

Content:

Date:
2021-06-01

Authors:
Kaze FF Kengne AP Atanga LC Monny Lobe M Menanga AP Halle MP Chetcha Chemegni B Ngo Sack F Kingue S Ashuntantang G

Journal:
Clinical kidney journal

Content:

Date:
2012-10-01

Authors:
GBD 2020 Release 1 Vaccine Coverage Collaborators

Journal:
Lancet (London, England)

Content:

Date:
2021-07-01

Authors:
Fezeu LK Assah FK Balkau B Mbanya DS Kengne AP Awah PK Mbanya JC

Journal:
Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)

Content:

Date:
2008-03-01

Authors:
Kengne AP Dzudie AI Fezeu LL Mbanya JC

Journal:
The international journal of lower extremity wounds

Content:

Date:
2006-03-01

Authors:
Kengne AP Awah PK Fezeu L Mbanya JC

Journal:
African health sciences

Content:

Date:
2007-03-01

Authors:
Vergotine Z Kengne AP Erasmus RT Yako YY Matsha TE

Journal:
International journal of endocrinology

Content:

Date:
2014-08-01

Authors:
Aminde LN Takah NF Noubiap JJ Tindong M Ngwasiri C Jingi AM Kengne AP Dzudie A

Journal:
BMC public health

Content:

Date:
2015-11-01

Authors:
Moons KG Kengne AP Woodward M Royston P Vergouwe Y Altman DG Grobbee DE

Journal:
Heart (British Cardiac Society)

Content:

Date:
2012-03-01

Authors:
van Dieren S Kengne AP Chalmers J Beulens JW Cooper ME Grobbee DE Harrap S Mancia G Neal B Patel A Poulter N van der Schouw YT Woodward M Zoungas S

Journal:
Diabetes research and clinical practice

Content:

Date:
2012-06-01

Authors:
GBD 2016 Traumatic Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury Collaborators

Journal:
The Lancet. Neurology

Content:

Date:
2018-11-01

Authors:
Eric Vounsia Balti André Pascal Kengne Jean Valentin Fogha Fokouo Brice Enid Nouthé Eugene Sobngwi

Journal:

Content:
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Determinants of post-acute stroke outcomes in Africa have been less investigated. We assessed the association of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and insulin resistance with post-stroke mortality in patients with first-ever-in-lifetime stroke in the capital city of Cameroon (sub-Saharan Africa). METHODS: Patients with an acute first-stroke event (n = 57) were recruited between May and October 2006, and followed for 5 years for mortality outcome. MetS definition was based on the Joint Interim Statement 2009, insulin sensitivity/resistance assessed via glucose-to-insulin ratio, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index and homeostatic model assessment. RESULTS: Overall, 24 (42%) patients deceased during follow-up. The prevalence of MetS was higher in patients who died after 28 days, 1 year and 5 years from any cause or cardiovascular-related causes (all p≤0.040). MetS was associated with an increased overall mortality both after 1 year (39% vs. 9%) and 5 years of follow-up (55% vs. 26%, p = 0.022). Similarly, fatal events due to cardiovascular-related conditions were more frequent in the presence of MetS both 1 year (37% vs. 9%) and 5 years after the first-ever-in-lifetime stroke (43% vs. 13%, p = 0.017). Unlike biochemical measures of insulin sensitivity and resistance (non-significant), in age- and sex-adjusted Cox models, MetS was associated with hazard ratio (95% CI) of 2.63 (1.03-6.73) and 3.54 (1.00-12.56) respectively for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality 5 years after stroke onset. CONCLUSION: The Joint Interim Statement 2009 definition of MetS may aid the identification of a subgroup of black African stroke patients who may benefit from intensification of risk factor management.

Date:

Authors:
Carmen Pheiffer Victoria Pillay-van Wyk Eunice Turawa Naomi Levitt Andre P. Kengne Debbie Bradshaw

Journal:
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Content:

Date:
2021-05-30

Authors:
Di Cesare M Sorić M Bovet P Miranda JJ Bhutta Z Stevens GA Laxmaiah A Kengne AP Bentham J

Journal:
BMC medicine

Content:

Date:
2019-11-01

Authors:
Muyunda Mutemwa Nasheeta Peer Anniza De Villiers Mieke Faber Andre-Pascal Kengne

Journal:
Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine

Content:

Date:
2020-04-21

Authors:
Peer N Naicker A Khan M Kengne AP

Journal:
SAGE open medicine

Content:

Date:
2020-07-01

Authors:
Anastase, Dzudie Suiru, Dzekem Andre, Pascal Kengne

Journal:

Content:

Date:
2017-01-01

Authors:
Macharia M Kengne AP Blackhurst DM Erasmus RT Matsha TE

Journal:
Journal of clinical pathology

Content:

Date:
2013-07-01

Authors:
NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (NCD-RisC)

Journal:
Nature

Content:

Date:
2020-06-01

Authors:
Kuate-Tegueu C Temfack E Ngankou S Doumbe J Djientcheu VP Kengne AP

Journal:
Journal of the neurological sciences

Content:

Date:
2015-05-01

Authors:
Davidson FE Matsha TE Erasmus RT Ismail S Kengne AP Goedecke JH

Journal:
European journal of clinical nutrition

Content:

Date:
2020-04-01

Authors:
NCD Risk Factor Collaboration (NCD-RisC)

Journal:
Lancet (London, England)

Content:

Date:
2021-08-01

Authors:
Davids SF Matsha TE Peer N Erasmus RT Kengne AP

Journal:
Frontiers in endocrinology

Content:

Date:
2019-11-01

Authors:
Aminde LN Dzudie A Kengne AP

Journal:
BMJ open

Content:

Date:
2016-02-01

Authors:
Kuate D Kengne AP Biapa CP Azantsa BG Abdul Manan Bin Wan Muda W

Journal:
Lipids in health and disease

Content:

Date:
2015-05-01

Authors:
Kengne AP Czernichow S Huxley R Grobbee D Woodward M Neal B Zoungas S Cooper M Glasziou P Hamet P Harrap SB Mancia G Poulter N ADVANCE Collaborative Group

Journal:
Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979)

Content:

Date:
2009-05-01

Authors:
Davidson FE Matsha TE Erasmus RT Kengne AP Goedecke JH

Journal:
Diabetology & metabolic syndrome

Content:

Date:
2019-11-01

Authors:
Peprah E Armstrong-Hough M Cook S Mukasa B Taylor J Xu H Chang L Gyamfi J Ryan N Ojo T Snyder A Iwelunmor J Ezechi O Iyegbe C Pascal Kengne A

Journal:
International journal of environmental research and public health

Content:

Date:
2021-03-01

Authors:
Kengne AP Dzudie A Sobngwi E

Journal:
Vascular health and risk management

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Date:
2008-01-01

Authors:
Yone EW Balkissou AD Kengne AP Kuaban C

Journal:
BMC pulmonary medicine

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Date:
2012-08-01

Authors:
Adom T Puoane T De Villiers A Kengne AP

Journal:
BMJ open

Content:

Date:
2017-02-01

Authors:
Gary Maartens Annemie Stewart Rulan Griesel Andre P. Kengne Felix Dube Mark Nicol Molebogeng X. Rangaka Marc Mendelson

Journal:
Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine

Content:

Date:
2018-07-23

Authors:
Masoud M Kengne AP Erasmus RT Hon GM Macharia M Matsha TE

Journal:
Indian journal of clinical biochemistry : IJCB

Content:

Date:
2018-03-01

Authors:
Dzudie A Choukem SP Dehayem MY Kengne AP

Journal:
Journal of diabetes

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Date:
2012-12-01

Authors:
Thomas B Matsushita K Abate KH Al-Aly Z Ärnlöv J Asayama K Atkins R Badawi A Ballew SH Banerjee A Barregård L Barrett-Connor E Basu S Global Burden of Disease Genitourinary Expert Group

Journal:
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : JASN

Content:

Date:
2017-04-01

Authors:
Kengne AP Awah PK

Journal:
QJM : monthly journal of the Association of Physicians

Content:

Date:
2009-01-01

Authors:
Jillian Hill Camille Lavigne Delville Anne-Marie Auorousseau Deborah Jonathan Nasheeta Peer Brian Oldenburg Andre-Pascal Kengne

Journal:
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Content:

Date:
2020-01-30

Authors:
Mhandire D Mhandire K Magadze M Wonkam A Kengne AP Dandara C

Journal:

Content:

Date:
2020-05-01

Authors:
GBD 2016 Risk Factors Collaborators

Journal:
Lancet (London, England)

Content:

Date:
2017-09-01

Authors:
Malambo P Kengne AP Lambert EV De Villiers A Puoane T

Journal:
Journal of physical activity & health

Content:

Date:
2017-10-01

Authors:
Kaze FF Kengne AP Magatsing CT Halle MP Yiagnigni E Ngu KB

Journal:
Journal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.)

Content:

Date:
2016-01-01

Authors:
Kaze FF Kengne AP Choukem SP Dzudie A Halle MP Dehayem MY Ashuntantang G

Journal:
American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation

Content:

Date:
2008-06-01

Authors:
Mazidi M Ofori-Asenso R Kengne AP

Journal:
Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology

Content:

Date:
2020-05-01

Authors:
Nkoke C Balti E Menanga A Dzudie A Lekoubou A Kingue S Kengne AP

Journal:
Translational pediatrics

Content:

Date:
2017-01-01

Authors:
ADVANCE Collaborative Group Patel A MacMahon S Chalmers J Neal B Billot L Woodward M Marre M Cooper M Glasziou P Grobbee D Hamet P Travert F

Journal:
The New England journal of medicine

Content:

Date:
2008-06-01

Authors:
Nguyen KA Peer N Kengne AP.

Journal:

Content:

Date:
2021-01-01

Authors:
Ngwa EN Kengne AP Tiedeu-Atogho B Mofo-Mato EP Sobngwi E

Journal:
Diabetology & metabolic syndrome

Content:

Date:
2015-04-01

Authors:
George C Matsha TE Korf M Zemlin AE Erasmus RT Kengne AP

Journal:
BMC nephrology

Content:

Date:
2020-01-01

Authors:
Lekoubou A Clovis N Dzudie A Kengne AP

Journal:
Primary care diabetes

Content:

Date:
2016-07-01

Authors:
Olalekan A Uthman Chidozie U Nduka Mustapha Abba Rocio Enriquez Helena Nordenstedt Fred Nalugoda Andre P Kengne Anna M Ekström

Journal:

Content:

Date:
2017-11-16

Authors:
Andre Pascal Kengne Sébastien Czernichow Mark Hamer G David Batty Emmanuel Stamatakis

Journal:

Content:
Both anaemia and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are common in people with diabetes. While individually both characteristics are known to raise mortality risk, their combined influence has yet to be quantified. In this pooling project, we examined the combined impact of baseline haemoglobin levels and existing CVD on all-cause and CVD mortality in people with diabetes. We draw comparison of these effects with those apparent in diabetes-free individuals.A combined analyses of 7 UK population-based cohorts resulted in 26,480 study members. There were 946 participants with physician-diagnosed diabetes, 2227 with anaemia [haemoglobin<13 g/dl (men) or <12 (women)], 2592 with existing CVD (stroke, ischaemic heart disease), and 21,396 with none of the conditions. Across diabetes and anaemia subgroups, and using diabetes-free, non-anaemic participants as the referent group, the adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were 1.46 (95% CI: 1.30-1.63) for anaemia, 1.67 (1.45-1.92) for diabetes, and 2.10 (1.55-2.85) for diabetes and anaemia combined. Across combined diabetes, anaemia and CVD subgroups, and compared with non-anaemic, diabetes-free and CVD-free participants, HR (95% CI) for all-cause mortality were 1.49 (1.32-1.69) anaemia, 1.60 (1.46-1.76) for existing CVD, and 1.66 (1.39-1.97) for diabetes alone. Equivalents were 2.13 (1.48-3.07) for anaemia and diabetes, 2.68 (2.14-3.36) for diabetes and existing CVD, and 3.25 (1.88-5.62) for the three combined. Patterns were similar for CVD mortality.Individually, anaemia and CVD confer similar mortality risks in people with diabetes, and are excessively fatal in combination. Screening for anaemia would identify vulnerable diabetic patients whose outcomes can potentially be improved.

Date:

Authors:
Mazidi M Kengne AP

Journal:
Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland)

Content:

Date:
2018-08-01

Authors:
Cecil J. Weale Glenda M. Davison Gloudina M. Hon Andre P. Kengne Rajiv T. Erasmus Tandi E. Matsha

Journal:
Cells

Content:

Date:
2019-05-16

Authors:
Eric Walter Pefura Yone Awa Foueudjeu Betyoumin André Pascal Kengne François Jérome Kaze Folefack Jeanne Ngogang

Journal:

Content:
First-line antiretroviral therapy and dyslipidemia in people living with HIV-1 in Cameroon: a cross-sectional study

Date:

Authors:
Dzudie A Aminde L Ngowe Ngowe M Takah N Luma HN Doualla MS Mapoure Y Mbatchou H Njamen TN Priso EB Kengne AP Sliwa-Hahnle K Nkwescheu AS Sone AM

Journal:
Cardiovascular journal of Africa

Content:

Date:
2014-09-01

Authors:
Mazidi M Kengne AP

Journal:
European journal of clinical investigation

Content:

Date:
2017-03-01

Authors:
Kaze AD Schutte AE Erqou S Kengne AP Echouffo-Tcheugui JB

Journal:
Journal of hypertension

Content:

Date:
2017-07-01

Authors:
Echouffo-Tcheugui JB Sobngwi E Kengne AP

Journal:
Archives of internal medicine

Content:

Date:
2012-03-01

Authors:
NCD Countdown 2030 collaborators

Journal:
Lancet (London, England)

Content:

Date:
2018-09-01

Authors:
Choukem SP Sih C Ntumsi AT Dimala CA Mboue-Djieka Y Ngouadjeu EDT Kengne AP

Journal:
BMC cardiovascular disorders

Content:

Date:
2020-03-01

Authors:
Kaze FF Njukeng FA Kengne AP Ashuntantang G Mbu R Halle MP Asonganyi T

Journal:
BMC pregnancy and childbirth

Content:

Date:
2014-04-01

Authors:
Steve Raoul Noumegni Jobert Richie Nansseu Jean Joel Bigna Vicky Jocelyne Ama Moor Felix Kembe Assah Mesmin Y Dehayem Andre Pascal Kengne Eugene Sobngwi

Journal:

Content:
Background The paucity of data regarding the association between atherogenic index of plasma and risk of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected populations living in sub-Saharan Africa prompted us to conduct this study which aimed to assess the relationship between atherogenic index of plasma and risk of cardiovascular disease among a Cameroonian HIV-infected population. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted among 452 HIV-infected adults in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Risk of cardiovascular disease was calculated using the Framingham risk score; atherogenic index of plasma was derived as log (triglycerides/high-density lipoproteins cholesterol). Results Participants’ mean age (80% females) was 44.4 ± 9.8 years. Atherogenic index of plasma values ranged from –0.63 to 1.36 with a median of 0.11 (25th–75th percentiles: –0.08-0.31). Most participants (88.5%) were on antiretroviral treatment. There was a significant correlation between atherogenic index of plasma and fasting plasma glucose (r = 0.116; p = 0.014), atherogenic index of plasma and total cholesterol (r = –0.164; p < 0.001). Atherogenic index of plasma was significantly associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease either in univariable (β = 5.05, 95% CI: 3.31–6.79; p < 0.001, R 2 = 0.067) or in multivariable linear regression model after adjusting for socio-demographic, clinical and biological confounders (adjusted β = 3.79, 95% CI: 1.65 – 4.88; p < 0.001, R 2 = 0.187). Conclusion Atherogenic index of plasma may be an independent factor impacting the risk of cardiovascular disease among Cameroonian HIV-infected people. More studies are needed to better elucidate the association between atherogenic index of plasma and risk of cardiovascular disease in our setting.

Date:
2017-01-01

Authors:
GBD 2013 Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators

Journal:
Lancet (London, England)

Content:

Date:
2014-12-01

Authors:
Moons KG Kengne AP Grobbee DE Royston P Vergouwe Y Altman DG Woodward M

Journal:
Heart (British Cardiac Society)

Content:

Date:
2012-03-01

Authors:
Andre Pascal Kengne Anastase Dzudie Eugene Sobngwi

Journal:

Content:
Andre Pascal Kengne1, Anastase Dzudie2, Eugene Sobngwi31The George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Australia; 2Heart failure and transplantation Unit, Louis Pradel’s Cardiovascular Hospital, Lyon, France; 3National Obesity Centre, Yaounde Central Hospital, CameroonPurpose: Heart failure is the ultimate complication of cardiac involvements in diabetes. The purpose of this review was to summarize current literature on heart failure among people with diabetes mellitus in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).Method: Bibliographic search of published data on heart failure and diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa over the past 26 years.Results: Heart failure remains largely unexplored in general population and among people with diabetes in Africa. Heart failure accounts for over 30% of hospital admission in specialized cardiovascular units and 3%–7% in general internal medicine. Over 11% of adults with heart failure have diabetes. Risk factors for heart failure among those with diabetes include classical cardiovascular risk factors, without evidence of diabetes distinctiveness for other predictors common in Africa. Prevention, management, and outcomes of heart failure are less well known; recent data suggest improvement in the management of risk factors in clinical settings.Conclusions: Diabetes mellitus is growing in SSA. Related cardiovascular diseases are emerging as potential health problem. Heart failure as cardiovascular complication remains largely unexplored. Efforts are needed through research to improve our knowledge of heart failure at large in Africa. Multilevel preventive measures, building on evidences from other parts of the world must go along side.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, heart failure, sub-Saharan Africa

Date:
2008-01-01

Authors:
Alain Lekoubou Paschal Awah Leopold Fezeu Eugene Sobngwi Andre Pascal Kengne

Journal:

Content:
Chronic diseases are becoming increasingly important in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The current density and distribution of health workforce suggest that SSA cannot respond to the growing demand for chronic disease care, together with the frequent infectious diseases. Innovative approaches are therefore needed to rapidly expand the health workforce. In this article, we discuss the evidences in support of nurse-led strategies for chronic disease management in SSA, with a focus on hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

Date:
2010-01-01

Authors:
Kengne AP Masconi K Mbanya VN Lekoubou A Echouffo-Tcheugui JB Matsha TE

Journal:
Critical reviews in clinical laboratory sciences

Content:

Date:
2013-12-01

Authors:
Yone EW Kengne AP

Journal:
HIV/AIDS (Auckland, N.Z.)

Content:

Date:
2012-12-01

Authors:
Ruffieux N Njamnshi AK Mayer E Sztajzel R Eta SC Doh RF Kengne AM Ngamaleu RN Chanal J Verdon V Hauert CA

Journal:
Child neuropsychology : a journal on normal and abnormal development in childhood and adolescence

Content:

Date:
2009-04-01

Authors:
George C Matsha TE Erasmus RT Kengne AP

Journal:
BMJ open

Content:

Date:
2018-11-01

Authors:
Camara A Baldé NM Sobngwi-Tambekou J Kengne AP Diallo MM Tchatchoua AP Kaké A Sylvie N Balkau B Bonnet F Sobngwi E

Journal:
Diabetes research and clinical practice

Content:

Date:
2014-09-01

Authors:
Mazidi M Kengne AP Katsiki N Mikhailidis DP Banach M

Journal:
Journal of diabetes and its complications

Content:

Date:
2017-10-01

Authors:
Lekoubou Looti AZ Kengne AP Djientcheu Vde P Kuate CT Njamnshi AK

Journal:
Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry

Content:

Date:
2010-07-01

Authors:
Peer N George C Kengne AP

Journal:
South African medical journal = Suid-Afrikaanse tydskrif vir geneeskunde

Content:

Date:
2019-12-01

Authors:
Clement N. Kufe Lisa K. Micklesfield Maphoko Masemola Tinashe Chikowore Andre Pascal Kengne Fredrik Karpe Shane A. Norris Nigel J. Crowther Tommy Olsson Julia H. Goedecke

Journal:

Content:

Date:
2021-10-26

Authors:
GBD 2015 Mortality and Causes of Death Collaborators

Journal:
Lancet (London, England)

Content:

Date:
2016-10-01

Authors:
Theodosia Adom Anniza De Villiers Thandi Puoane André Pascal Kengne

Journal:
Nutrients

Content:

Date:
2021-11-11

Authors:
Duan D Kengne AP Echouffo-Tcheugui JB

Journal:
Endocrinology and metabolism clinics of North America

Content:

Date:
2021-07-01

Authors:
Mutemwa M Peer N de Villiers A Mukasa B Matsha TE Mills EJ Kengne AP

Journal:
Medicine

Content:

Date:
2018-08-01

Authors:
Choukem SP Dzudie A Dehayem M Halle MP Doualla MS Luma H Kengne AP

Journal:
The Pan African medical journal

Content:

Date:
2012-04-01

Authors:
Nguyen KA Peer N Mills EJ Kengne AP

Journal:
PloS one

Content:

Date:
2016-03-01

Authors:
Mohsen Mazidi Andre Pascal Kengne L. J. Cheskin Maciej Banach

Journal:

Content:
Abstract Background To examine the association between serum concentrations of antioxidant and telomere length (TL) in U.S adults. Methods Participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) with data available on TL measures from 2001 to 2002 were included. Serum lipophilic antioxidants level was measured using high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. We used analysis of co-variance and multivariable-adjusted linear regression models, accounting for the survey design and sample weights. Results Of the 5992 eligible participants, 47.5% (n = 2844) were men. The mean age was 46.9 years overall, 47.2 years in men and 46.6 in women (p = 0.071). In age, sex, race, education, marital status, adiposity, smoking, C-reactive protein adjusted linear regressions, antioxidant, serum α-carotene, trans-β-carotene, cis- β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin and combined Lutein/zeaxanthin were positively and significantly associated with TL (all p < 0.001). Conclusions Our findings support a possible positive association between serum concentrations of lipophylic antioxidant and TL. The implications of this association deserve further investigation.

Date:
2018-01-01

Authors:
Mazidi M Shivappa N Wirth MD Hebert JR Vatanparast H Kengne AP

Journal:
European journal of clinical nutrition

Content:

Date:
2017-10-01

Authors:
Pefura-Yone EW Mbele-Onana CL Balkissou AD Kenmegne-Noumsi EC Boulleys-Nana JR Kolontchang-Yomi BL Theubo-Kamgang BJ Ndjeutcheu-Moualeu PI for Groupe Enquête en Santé Respiratoire au Cameroun (GESRC)

Journal:
The Journal of asthma : official journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma

Content:

Date:
2015-07-01

Authors:
Kassebaum NJ Bertozzi-Villa A Coggeshall MS Shackelford KA Steiner C Heuton KR Gonzalez-Medina D Barber R Huynh C Dicker D Templin T Lozano R

Journal:
Lancet (London, England)

Content:

Date:
2014-05-01

Authors:
Odukoya OO Ohazurike C Akanbi M O'Dwyer LC Isikekpei B Kuteyi E Ameh IO Osadiaye O Adebayo K Usinoma A Adewole A Odunukwe N Okuyemi K Kengne AP.

Journal:

Content:

Date:
2021-01-01

Authors:
Ibrahim Chikowe Victor Mwapasa Andre Pascal Kengne

Journal:

Content:
Abstract Objective There is limited data on the quality of primary care management for diabetes mellitus across Africa. The study was aimed at assessing the availability of basic supplies for the rapid diagnosis, treatment and management of diabetes in Malawian rural health facilities. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 55 public and private health centers from 19 districts using a structured questionnaire and checklist to interview the pharmacy personnel or officer in-charge of the health centers. We focused on availability of information, diagnosis and treatment materials for diabetes. Results Of the 55 health facilities surveyed, 21, 23 and 11 were located in the central, southern and northern regions of Malawi, respectively. Overall, 38% (21/55) of the health centres had glucometers, while 24% (13/55) had urine glucose dipsticks. Only 4% (2/55) of the health centres had recommended first-line medicines for treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. No health centre had diabetes patient records and information, education and communication materials. Most rural health centers in Malawi lack basic health commodities for the screening, diagnosis and treatment of diabetes and this impedes on their effective management of growing diabetes burden. Therefore, health care systems need to adequately equip primary care facilities.

Date:
2018-01-01

Authors:
Kaze FF Halle MP Mopa HT Ashuntantang G Fouda H Ngogang J Kengne AP

Journal:
BMC nephrology

Content:

Date:
2015-07-01

Authors:
Pefura-Yone EW Kengne AP Balkissou AD Magne-Fotso CG Ngo-Yonga M Boulleys-Nana JR Efe-de-Melingui NR Ndjeutcheu-Moualeu PI Mbele-Onana CL Respiratory Health Survey Group in Cameroon (RHSGC)

Journal:
BMC research notes

Content:

Date:
2016-02-01

Authors:
Noumegni SR Ama VJM Assah FK Bigna JJ Nansseu JR Kameni JAM Katte JC Dehayem MY Kengne AP Sobngwi E

Journal:
Tropical diseases, travel medicine and vaccines

Content:

Date:
2017-07-01

Authors:
Gouda HN Charlson F Sorsdahl K Ahmadzada S Ferrari AJ Erskine H Leung J Santamauro D Lund C Aminde LN Mayosi BM Kengne AP Harris M Whiteford H

Journal:
The Lancet. Global health

Content:

Date:
2019-10-01

Authors:
Kengne AP Ntsekhe M

Journal:
Circulation

Content:

Date:
2018-05-01

Authors:
Masconi KL Echouffo-Tcheugui JB Matsha TE Erasmus RT Kengne AP

Journal:
Expert review of endocrinology & metabolism

Content:

Date:
2015-02-01

Authors:
GBD 2016 DALYs and HALE Collaborators

Journal:
Lancet (London, England)

Content:

Date:
2017-09-01

Authors:
Goedecke JH Mtintsilana A Dlamini SN Kengne AP

Journal:
Diabetes research and clinical practice

Content:

Date:
2016-12-01

Authors:
Kengne AP Limen SN Sobngwi E Djouogo CF Nouedoui C

Journal:
Diabetology & metabolic syndrome

Content:

Date:
2012-05-01

Authors:
Kaze FF Maimouna M Beybey AF Pefura-Yone EW Balkissou AD Halle MP Kowo MP Ashuntantang G Kengne AP

Journal:
Clinical and experimental nephrology

Content:

Date:
2021-03-01

Authors:
Peer N Kengne AP Motala AA Mbanya JC

Journal:
Diabetes research and clinical practice

Content:

Date:
2013-12-01

Authors:
Kengne AP Sobngwi E Fezeu LL Awah PK Dongmo S Mbanya JC

Journal:
The Journal of asthma : official journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma

Content:

Date:
2008-08-01

Authors:
Jun Hata Hisatomi Arima Sophia Zoungas Greg Fulcher Carol Pollock Mark Adams John Watson Rohina Joshi Andre Pascal Kengne Toshiharu Ninomiya Craig Anderson Mark Woodward Anushka Patel Giuseppe Mancia Neil Poulter Stephen MacMahon John Chalmers Bruce Neal

Journal:

Content:
Endpoint adjudication committees (EPAC) are widely used in clinical trials. The aim of the present analysis is to assess the effects of the endpoint adjudication process on the main findings of the ADVANCE trial (Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00145925).The ADVANCE trial was a multicentre, 2 × 2 factorial randomised controlled trial of blood pressure lowering and intensive blood glucose control in 11140 patients with type 2 diabetes. Primary outcomes were major macrovascular (nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke and cardiovascular death) and microvascular (new or worsening nephropathy and retinopathy) events. Suspected primary outcomes were initially reported by the investigators at the 215 sites with subsequent adjudication by the EPAC. The EPAC also adjudicated upon potential events identified directly by ongoing screening of all reported events. Over a median follow-up of 5 years, the site investigators reported one or more primary outcomes among 2443 participants. After adjudication these events were confirmed for 2077 (85%) with 48 further events added through the EPAC-led database screening process. The estimated relative risk reductions (95% confidence intervals) in the primary outcome for the blood pressure lowering comparison were 8% (-1 to 15%) based on the investigator-reported events and 9% (0 to 17%) based on the EPAC-based events (P for homogeneity = 0.70). The corresponding findings for the glucose comparison were 8% (1 to 15%) and 10% (2% to 18%) (P for homogeneity = 0.60). The effect estimates were also highly comparable when studied separately for macrovascular events and microvascular events for both comparisons (all P for homogeneity>0.6).The endpoint adjudication process had no discernible impact on the main findings in ADVANCE. These data highlight the need for careful consideration of the likely impact of an EPAC on the findings and conclusions of clinical trials prior to their establishment.

Date:

Authors:
Dzudie A Njume E Mfekeu LK Djomou A Ba H Ndom MS Nkoke C Ndongo S Boombhi J Kamdem F Mouandjo JPD Mouliom SA Kouam CK Meli H Monkam Y Cameroon Cardiac Society and MMM Cameroon investigator group

Journal:
European heart journal supplements : journal of the European Society of Cardiology

Content:

Date:
2021-05-01

Authors:

Journal:
Circulation

Content:
BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease, the major cause of mortality and morbidity in modern societies, is set to overtake infectious diseases in the developing world as the most common cause of death. The increasing prevalence of major and emerging cardiovascular risk factors accounts for the growing burden of cardiovascular disease in the world. Diabetes in all its forms is one of the main cardiovascular risk factors. Two of 3 diabetic patients will die as a result of cardiovascular complications, and approximately 30% of patients treated in cardiovascular intensive care units have diabetes. METHODS AND RESULTS: This review on the cardiovascular complications of diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa is a bibliographical MEDLINE search of published data over the past 2 decades. Diabetes-related cardiovascular disease complications are considered to be rare in Africa but are on the rise and are regularly associated with classic cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary heart disease may affect 5% to 8% of type 2 diabetic patients and cardiomyopathy, up to 50% of all patients. Close to 15% of patients with stroke have diabetes, and up to 5% of diabetic patients present with cerebrovascular accidents at diagnosis. Peripheral vascular disease prevalence varies across sites from 4% to 28%. CONCLUSIONS: It is obvious that diabetes mellitus and related cardiovascular complications are gaining more importance in sub-Saharan Africa. The relative contribution of putative risk factors is not well defined, and further research is therefore needed.

Date:
2005-12-01

Authors:
Halle MP Zebaze PN Mbofung CM Kaze F Mbiatat H Ashuntantang G Kengne AP

Journal:
Journal of nephrology

Content:

Date:
2014-01-01

Authors:
Echouffo-Tcheugui JB Kengne AP

Journal:
Diabetes & metabolism

Content:

Date:
2013-09-01

Authors:
Mohsen Mazidi Hong-kai Gao Andre Pascal Kengne

Journal:
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism

Content:

Date:
2017-01-01

Authors:
Tandi E. Matsha Saaiga Ismail Aladdin Speelman Gloudina M. Hon Saarah Davids Rajiv T. Erasmus Andre P. Kengne

Journal:
Clinical Nutrition ESPEN

Content:

Date:
2019-08-01

Authors:
Noubiap JJ Nansseu JR Bigna JJ Jingi AM Kengne AP

Journal:
BMJ open

Content:

Date:
2015-03-01

Authors:
Noubiap JJ Agbaedeng TA Ndoadoumgue AL Nyaga UF Kengne AP

Journal:
Journal of cardiovascular electrophysiology

Content:

Date:
2021-05-01

Authors:
GBD 2015 Child Mortality Collaborators

Journal:
Lancet (London, England)

Content:

Date:
2016-10-01

Authors:
Eric Walter Pefura-Yone Adamou Dodo Balkissou Virginie Poka-Mayap Hadja Koté Fatime-Abaicho Patrick Thierry Enono-Edende André Pascal Kengne

Journal:

Content:
Abstract Background Death under care is a major challenge for tuberculosis (TB) treatment programs. We derived and validated a simple score to predict mortality during tuberculosis treatment in high endemicity areas. Methods We used data for patients aged ≥15 years, diagnosed and treated for tuberculosis at the Yaounde Jamot Hospital between January 2012 and December 2013. Baseline characteristics associated with mortality were investigated using logistic regressions. A simple prognosis score (CABI) was constructed with regression coefficients for predictors in the final model. Internal validation used bootstrap resampling procedures. Models discrimination was assessed using c-statistics and calibration assessed via calibration plots and the Hosmer and Lemeshwow (H-L) statistics. The optimal score was based on the Youden’s index. Results A total of 2250 patients (men 57.2%) with a mean age of 35.8 years were included; among whom 213 deaths (cumulative incidence 9.5%) were recorded. Clinical form of tuberculosis (C), age (A, years), adjusted body mass index (B, BMI, kg/m2) and status for HIV (Human immunodefiency virus) infection (I) were significant predictors in the final model (p < 0.0001) which was of the form Death risk = 1/(1 + e − (−1.3120 + 0.0474 ∗ age − 0.1866 ∗ BMI + 1.1637 (if smear negative TB) + 0.5418(if extra − pulmonary TB) + 1.3820(if HIV+))). The c-statistic was 0.812 in the derivation sample and 0.808 after correction for optimism. The calibration was good [H-Lχ2 = 6.44 (p = 0.60)]. The optimal absolute risk threshold was 4.8%, corresponding to a sensitivity of 81% and specificity of 67%. Conclusions The preliminary promising findings from this study require confirmation through independent external validation studies. If confirmed, the model derived could facilitate the stratification of TB patients for mortality risk and implementation of additional monitoring and management measures in vulnerable patients.

Date:
2017-01-01

Authors:
Khazdouz M Mazidi M Ehsaei MR Ferns G Kengne AP Norouzy AR

Journal:
Journal of dietary supplements

Content:

Date:
2017-05-01

Authors:
Arthemon Nguweneza Chandré Oosterwyk Kambe Banda Victoria Nembaware Gaston Mazandu Andre P Kengne Ambroise Wonkam

Journal:
Expert Review of Hematology

Content:

Date:
2022-04-03

Authors:
Nguyen KA Peer N de Villiers A Mukasa B Matsha TE Mills EJ Kengne AP

Journal:
PloS one

Content:

Date:
2017-09-01

Authors:
Theodosia Adom André Pascal Kengne Anniza De Villiers Rose Boatin Thandi Puoane

Journal:
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Content:

Date:
2019-12-19

Authors:
Kengne AP Czernichow S Stamatakis E Hamer M Batty GD

Journal:
Diabetes & vascular disease research

Content:

Date:
2012-07-01

Authors:
Zemlin AE Matsha TE Kengne AP Hon G Erasmus RT

Journal:
Journal of medical biochemistry

Content:

Date:
2016-10-01

Authors:
George C Goedecke JH Crowther NJ Jaff NG Kengne AP Norris SA Micklesfield LK

Journal:
PloS one

Content:

Date:
2016-05-01

Authors:
Businge CB Madini N Longo-Mbenza B Kengne AP

Journal:
BMJ open

Content:

Date:
2019-05-01

Authors:
Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 Collaborators

Journal:
Lancet (London, England)

Content:

Date:
2015-06-01

Authors:
Kanmogne GD Fonsah JY Umlauf A Moul J Doh RF Kengne AM Tang B Tagny CT Nchindap E Kenmogne L Franklin D Njamnshi DM Kuate CT Mbanya D Heaton RK

Journal:
Scientific reports

Content:

Date:
2020-08-01

Authors:
Gertrude Nsorma Nyaaba Karien Stronks Ama de-Graft Aikins Andre Pascal Kengne Charles Agyemang

Journal:

Content:
Abstract Background Half of the estimated annual 28 million non-communicable diseases (NCDs) deaths in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are attributed to weak health systems. Current health policy responses to NCDs are fragmented and vertical particularly in the African region. The World Health Organization (WHO) led NCDs Global action plan 2013–2020 has been recommended for reducing the NCD burden but it is unclear whether Africa is on track in its implementation. This paper synthesizes Africa’s progress towards WHO policy recommendations for reducing the NCD burden. Methods Data from the WHO 2011, 2014 and 2015 NCD reports were used for this analysis. We synthesized results by targets descriptions in the three reports and included indicators for which we could trace progress in at least two of the three reports. Results More than half of the African countries did not achieve the set targets for 2015 and slow progress had been made towards the 2016 targets as of December 2013. Some gains were made in implementing national public awareness programmes on diet and/or physical activity, however limited progress was made on guidelines for management of NCD and drug therapy and counselling. While all regions in Africa show waning trends in fully achieving the NCD indicators in general, the Southern African region appears to have made the least progress while the Northern African region appears to be the most progressive. Conclusion Our findings suggest that Africa is off track in achieving the NCDs indicators by the set deadlines. To make sustained public health gains, more effort and commitment is urgently needed from governments, partners and societies to implement these recommendations in a broader strategy. While donors need to suit NCD advocacy with funding, African institutions such as The African Union (AU) and other sub-regional bodies such as West African Health Organization (WAHO) and various country offices could potentially play stronger roles in advocating for more NCD policy efforts in Africa.

Date:
2017-01-01

Authors:
Kajawo S Moloi MW Noubiap JJ Ekrikpo U Kengne AP Okpechi IG

Journal:
BMJ open