EDCTP Alumni Network

Fostering excellence and collaboration in the next generation of researchers

Call Career Development Fellowship (CDF)
Programme EDCTP2
Start Date 2018-07-01
End Date 2021-06-30
Project Code TMA2016CDF1605
Status Active

Title

PSOP24-377: An infectious bite marker for sensitive malaria detection and population level surveillance

Objectives

The overarching goal of the study is to validate novel malaria infectious-bite marker as a simple straightforward sero-surveillance tool to identify ‘hotspots’ and ‘hotpops’ for targeted interventions to yield maximum community-wide benefits. Specific Objectives 1. Determine kinetic antibody response to novel infectious-bite markers, gSG6-P1, PSOP24 and CSP and to compare with newly reported up-regulated salivary gland peptides 2. To compare with parasite prevalence with parasite prevalence, and entomological indices at household levels in study populations 3. Identify micro-geographic heterogeneities in malaria transmission using ArcGIS and spatial statistics, this will test the sensitivity and the reliability of sero-surveillance in identifying hotspots for targeted control 4. To find out the role of submicroscopic infections in malaria transmission at the household levels.

Host Organisation

Institution Country
Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Ghana

Participants

Name Institution Country
Christian Kwasi Owusu Kumasi Center for Collaborative Research Ghana
Prof. Soerge Kelm University of Bremen Germany

Study Design

Study design: This will be three -time point longitudinal community based survey at quarterly intervals cutting across both dry and rainy season. Serological, parasitological and entomological as well as demographic data will be collected at household level. The study will not discriminate participants in terms of age or gender but a representation of all age groups except infants of less than 6months where maternal antibodies drive immune response rather than exposure will be excluded. Blood samples from finger prick will be taken from an average of 4 people per household from 100 households per community. Measurement of humoral responses All test samples will be tested for anti-infectious-bite markers, CSP and anti-gSG6-P1 human IgG antibodies by ELISA using standard methodology [Badu et al 2012a]. Test sera will be serially diluted in duplicate on the plates from 1:50 to 1:64,000. Serial dilutions will be used to fit a four-parameter curve using SoftMax Pro v4.1 (Molecular Devices). Results will be expressed in titer values, the titer endpoint being defined as the calculated serum dilution yielding an optical density of 1.0. Expected Outcome The overarching goal of the study is to validate novel malaria infectious-bite marker as a simple straightforward sero surveillance tool to identify ‘hotspots’ and ‘hotpops’ for targeted interventions to yield maximum community-wide benefits. This proposal will seek to determine heterogeneity in antibody response to infectious-bites markers corresponding to exposure to infected Anopheles mosquitoes to identify restricted geographical areas (household –level) in which there is a higher level of transmission intensity.

Sites

Agona, Afigya Sekyere district, Ashanti Region and Obom, Greater Accra Region, Ghana

Students Supervised

Type Name Title University Start Date End Date
PhD THomas Addison Mr Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology 2018 2021
PhD Rita Frimpong Mrs Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology 2019 2022
MPhil Austine Tweneboah Mr. Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology 2019 2021

Results & Outcomes

Ongoing

Publications

Badu, Kingsley, Amma Aboagyewa Larbi, and Kwadwo Boampong. "Malaria Elimination: The Role and Value of Sero-Surveillance." (2021). DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.97131
Vera-Arias, C. A., Holzschuh, A., Oduma, C. O., Badu, K., Abdul-Hakim, M., Yukich, J., ... & Koepfli, C. (2021). Plasmodium falciparum hrp2 and hrp3 gene deletion status in Africa and South America by highly sensitive and specific digital PCR. medRxiv.

Current Organisation

Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology

Current Job Title

Senior Lecturer

Awards

2017 DFG German African Cooperation in Infectiology

Grants

Grant Code:
R01AI143809
Source of funding:
NIH
Amount:
247842.00
Role:
Co-Investigator
Start Date:
2019-01-01
End Date:
2024-01-01
Grant Code:
GRANT_NUMBER: 347702735
Source of funding:
German Research Foundation
Amount:
155000.00
Role:
Co Investigator
Start Date:
2017-01-01
End Date:
2021-01-01

Publications

Authors:
Abdul-Hakim Mutala , author
Kingsley Badu , author
Christian Owusu , author
Samuel Kekeli Agordzo , author
Austine Tweneboah , author
Dawood Ackom Abbas , author
Matthew Glover Addo , author
Date:
2020-07-09
Journal:
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Samuel Kekeli Agordzo , author
Kingsley Badu , author
Mathew Glover Addo , author
Christian Kwasi Owusu , author
Abdul-Hakim Mutala , author
Austine Tweneboah , author
Abbas Dawood Ackom , author
Nana Kwame Ayisi-Boateng , author
Date:
2019-11-26
Journal:
AAS Open Research
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Bonyah, E.
Badu, K.
Asiedu-Addo, S.K.
Date:
2016-01-01
Journal:
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine
Content:
Authors:
Date:
2010-01-01
Journal:
Journal of medical entomology
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Samuel Kekeli Agordzo , author
Kingsley Badu , author
Mathew Glover Addo , author
Christian Kwasi Owusu , author
Abdul-Hakim Mutala , author
Austine Tweneboah , author
Dawood Ackom Abbas , author
Nana Kwame Ayisi-Boateng , author
Date:
2020-06-17
Journal:
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Lionel Divin Mfisimana , author
Emile Nibayisabe , author
Kingsley Badu , author
David Niyukuri , author
Date:
2021-07-23
Journal:
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2016-12-01
Journal:
Journal of tropical pediatrics
Content:
Identifiers:
PMID: 27318111
Authors:
Austine Tweneboah , author
Jana Rosenau , author
Addo Kofi Agyapong , author
Thomas Kwame Addison , author
Ibrahim Mahamat Alhadj Moussa , author
Judith Weber , author
Soerge Kelm , author
Kingsley Badu , author
Date:
2021-08-12
Journal:
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Zohra Aloui-Zarrouk , author
Lahcen El Youssfi , author
Kingsley Badu , author
Adeniyi Francis Fagbamigbe , author
Damaris Matoke-Muhia , author
Caroline Ngugi , author
Natisha Dukhi , author
Grace Mwaura , author
Date:
2020-08-05
Journal:
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2015-01-01
Journal:
Annals of clinical microbiology and antimicrobials
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Omondi, E.O.
Nyabadza, F.
Bonyah, E.
Badu, K.
Date:
2017-01-01
Journal:
Journal of Biological Systems
Content:
Authors:
Abdul-Hakim Mutala , author
Kingsley Badu , author
Christian Owusu , author
Samuel Kekeli Agordzo , author
Austine Tweneboah , author
Abbas Dawood Ackom , author
Matthew Glover Addo , author
Date:
2019-07-29
Journal:
AAS Open Research
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2012-01-01
Journal:
Annals of clinical microbiology and antimicrobials
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Abdul-Hakim Mutala , author
Kingsley Badu , author
Christian Owusu , author
Samuel Kekeli Agordzo , author
Austine Tweneboah , author
Dawood Ackom Abbas , author
Matthew Glover Addo , author
Date:
2020-06-05
Journal:
AAS Open Research
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Abigail Naana Osei Agyemang , author
Kingsley Badu , author
Sandra Baffour-Awuah , author
Ellis Owusu-Dabo , author
Nana-Kwadwo Biritwum , author
Rolf Garms , author
Thomas Florian Kruppa , author
Date:
2018-09-01
Journal:
Acta Tropica
Content:
Authors:
Dawood Ackom Abbas , author
Abdul-Hakim Mutala , author
Samuel Kekeli Agordzo , author
Christian Kwasi Owusu , author
Bernard Walter Lartekwei Lawson , author
Kingsley Badu , author
Date:
2021-08-13
Journal:
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Kingsley Badu , author
Jessica P.R. Thorn , author
Nowsheen Goonoo , author
Natisha Dukhi , author
Adeniyi Francis Fagbamigbe , author
Benard W. Kulohoma , author
Kolapo Oyebola , author
Sara I. Abdelsalam , author
Wesley Doorsamy , author
Olawale Awe , author
Augustina Angelina Sylverken , author
Anthony Egeru , author
Jesse Gitaka , author
Date:
2020-05-18
Journal:
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2012-03-01
Journal:
BMC infectious diseases
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Tuno, N.
Kjaerandsen, J.
Badu, K.
Kruppa, T.
Date:
2010-01-01
Journal:
Journal of Medical Entomology
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Iqbal, S.A.
Botchway, F.
Badu, K.
Wilson, N.O.
Dei-Adomakoh, Y.
Dickinson-Copeland, C.M.
Chinbuah, H.
Adjei, A.A.
Wilson, M.
Stiles, J.K.
Driss, A.
Date:
2016-01-01
Journal:
Journal of Tropical Pediatrics
Content:
Identifiers:

Projects

Fellow:
Kingsley Badu
Collaborators:
Name Country Institution
Prof. Abraham Badu-Tawiah United States Ohio State University
Objectives:
05/15/2019
Sites:
Kumasi South Hospital and Agona Government Hospital
Study Design:
APPROACH The proposed research will use rationally designed and synthesized ionic probes (Aim 1) to facilitate ultrasensi-tive mass spectrometric detection of malaria biomarkers captured on paper-based microfluidic analytical plat-form (Aim 2). The 3D paper device supports both immunoassays (i.e., antibody reactions) and on-chip MS de-tection. In Aim 3, we will establish the correlation between biomarker (HRP-2 and Aldolase) concentration and parasite density using blood spiked with parasitized erythrocytes and clinical blood samples via analysis on ex-isting bench-top ion trap mass spectrometer, capable of MS/MS. To evaluate our on-demand diagnostic approach (in terms of stability, specificity and sensitivity), clinical sam-ples will be collected directly on the paper device in both low-risk (peri-urban community) and high-risk (remote field) settings in Ghana. In this surveillance on-demand testing, de-identified samples collected from both peri-urban and rural settings will comprise of sick hospitalized (symptomatic) population and community-based (asymptomatic) population. To address biological variability due to sex, we will use known malaria prevalence for male and female to determine sample size. The three Aims are integrated, but differ in many respects includ-ing the specific experimental design. Thus, this section is divided into rationale, experimental design and prelimi-nary data, expected results, and potential pitfalls.
Subjects:
Malaria surveillance and Diagnostics
Outcomes:
We expect to achieve the following milestones at the end of Aim 1: (1) to reach an optimized probe de-sign/structure that is stable after immunoassay enabling easy storage and transport for centralized test analy-sis; (2) to have established an amplification strategy that (i) has minimal effect on antibody binding capacity and (ii) provides PCR-level sensitivity through MS; and (3) to have developed probe stimulation chemistry that is fast or can be terminated (after initiation) to allow effective control of the MS signal amplification process. With-out signal amplification, our current detection limit (2.8 ng/mL) is comparable to that of ELISA (1 ng/mL) for HRP 2 antigen.24 Therefore, we believe the proposed amplification strategy will afford sensitivities close to that of PRC using only finger prick blood (~20 μL). We expect to develop a self-sustained paper device that requires no special storage conditions. The devices are expected to be reliable for at least 30 days after the time of use. Patients are expected to perform only two tasks when using the device: (1) application of sample and (2) the addition of a wash buffer to remove unbound species.
Linked Grant:
Malaria management through an on-demand diagnostic approach using novel ionic probes
Start Date:
2019-05-15
End Date:
2024-04-15

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