EDCTP Alumni Network

Fostering excellence and collaboration in the next generation of researchers

Call Career Development Fellowship (CDF)
Programme EDCTP2
Start Date 2021-07-01
End Date 2024-06-30
Project Code TMA2020CDF-3171
Status Active

Title

Plasmodium vivax burden, range and transmission among Duffy-negative inhabitants in Cameroon (VIBRANT)

Host Organisation

Institution Country
University of Dschang Cameroon

Current Organisation

University of Dschang

Current Job Title

Senior Lecturer- Researcher

Students Supervised

Type Name Title University Start Date End Date
Msc Keming Eva Mai Ms University of Dschang 2019 2021
Msc Nguene Darlin Bean Mr University of Dschang 2019 2021

Areas Of Specialisation

Malaria Neglected Infectious Diseases (NID)

Publications

Authors:
Date:
2022-12-01
Journal:
BMC Infectious Diseases
Content:
Abstract Background Many studies have reported high efficacy and safety of artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) when administered under direct observation in Cameroon. There is paucity of data to support their continuous use in home-based treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Cameroon. Hence, this study aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of AS-AQ versus AL for home-based treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria among children 6120 months in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Methods A two-arm, open-label, randomized, controlled trial comparing the equivalence of AS-AQ (experimental group) and AL (control group) was carried out from May 2019 to April 2020 at two secondary hospitals in Yaoundé. Participants were randomized to receive either AS-AQ or AL. After the first dose, antimalarial drugs were given at home, rather than under direct observation by a study staff. The conventional on-treatment and post-treatment laboratory and clinical evaluations were not done until day 3 of the full antimalarial treatment course. The evaluation of effectiveness was mainly based on per protocol polymerase chain reaction adjusted adequate clinical and parasitological response (PP PCR adjusted ACPR) on day 28 post-treatment. Safety was based on assessment of adverse events (AEs) and severe adverse events (SAEs) from day 1 to day 28. Results A total of 242 children were randomized to receive AS-AQ (n = 114) and AL (n = 128). The PP PCR adjusted day 28 cure rates were [AS-AQ = 96.9% (95% CI, 91.299.4) versus AL = 95.5% (95% CI, 89.998.5), P = 0.797]. Expected mild to moderate adverse events were reported in both arms [AS-AQ = 83 (84.7%) versus AL = 99 (86.1%), P = 0.774]. The most common adverse events included: transient changes of hematologic indices and fever. Conclusions This study demonstrated that AS-AQ and AL are effective and safe for home management of malaria in Yaoundé. The evidence from this study supports the parallel use of the two drugs in routine practice. However, the findings from this study do not describe the likely duration of antimalarial effectiveness in holoendemic areas where multiple courses of treatment might be required. Trial registration: This study is a randomized controlled trial and it was retrospectively registered on 23/09/2020 at ClinicalTrials.gov with registration number NCT04565184.
Identifiers:
Authors:
Ali, I.M.
Netongo, P.M.
Atogho-Tiedeu, B.
Ngongang, E.-O.
Ajua, A.
Achidi, E.A.
Mbacham, W.F.
Date:
2013-01-01
Journal:
Malaria Research and Treatment
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2021-08-01
Journal:
Journal of Agriculture and Food Research
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Mbacham, W.F.
Evehe, M.-S.B.
Netongo, P.M.
Ali, I.M.
Nfor, E.N.
Akaragwe, A.I.
Mimche, P.N.
Nji, A.
Djoko, C.F.
Tawe, B.
Gawa, B.
Asongna, T.
Toh, G.B.
Atogho-Tieudeu, B.
Nge, N.
Ebeng, R.
Mokube, J.A.
Kuaban, C.
Bickii, J.
Penlap, V.
Titanji, V.P.
Njikam, N.
Date:
2009-01-01
Journal:
African Journal of Biotechnology
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2020-05-20
Journal:
AIDS (London, England)
Content:
: Exposure of infants to antiretroviral drugs for prevention of mother-to-child transmission can induce resistance to nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). Data from nine national surveys of pretreatment drug resistance in children newly diagnosed with HIV show high levels of resistance to NRTIs included in first-line antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens (dual abacavir-lamivudine/emtricitabine resistance). Additional research is needed to determine the impact of NRTI resistance on treatment response and optimize infant ART.
Identifiers:
Authors:
Marcel Nyuylam Moyeh , author
Sandra Noukimi Fankem , author
Innocent Mbulli Ali , author
Denis Sofeu , author
Sorelle Mekachie Sandie , author
Dieudonne Lemuh Njimoh , author
Stephen Mbigha Ghogomu , author
Helen Kuokuo Kimbi , author
Wilfred Fon Mbacham , author
Date:
2022-03-31
Journal:
Pathogens and Global Health
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Akindeh M. Nji , author
Innocent Mbulli Ali , author
Peter Thelma Ngwa Niba , author
Evehe Marie-Solange , author
Christian Heumann , author
Guenter Froeschl , author
Wilfred F. Mbacham , author
Date:
2021-08-01
Journal:
Pathogens
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2020-12-21
Journal:
Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Content:
Remote areas of many low and middle income (LMI) countries have poor access to HIV viral load (HIV VL) testing. The SAMBA-II (Simple Amplification-based Assay) Semi-Q Whole Blood Test (Diagnostics for the Real World (DRW), Cambridge, UK) is a point of care assay which uses leucodepletion technology to allow whole blood testing in remote settings. 1540 consecutive HIV-positive clinic patients in Cameroon (250), UK (633), Ukraine (412) and Zimbabwe (245) donated venous blood (all countries) and finger-prick blood (all except UK) for testing on SAMBA-II. SAMBA II results were compared with simultaneous plasma results on the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL) viral load assay and interpreted as either <1000 RNA copies/ml or ≥1000 RNA copies/ml. For 1528 venous whole-blood samples tested on SAMBA II, overall percent agreement with the reference test at a cut-off of HIV VL ≥1000 cps/ml was 96.9% (1480/1528 95% CI 95.9-97.7), negative percent agreement 97.7% (1259/1289 95% CI 96.7-98.4), positive percent agreement 92.5% (221/239 95% CI 88.4-95.5). For 854 finger-prick samples there was 95.0% (811/854 95% CI 93.3-96.3) overall percent agreement; negative percent agreement 98.0% (625/638, 95% CI 96.5-98.9); positive percent agreement 86.1% (186/216 95% CI 80.8-90.4). These rose to 93.5% (82.1, 98.6), 97.6% (95.6, 98.8) and 95.6% (93.3, 97.3) after exclusion of aberrant results from the Ukraine centre. These results show a high level of agreement between SAMBA-II and a laboratory-based assay. SAMBA-II has a performance that is suitable to use as a VL point of care assay in remote settings
Identifiers:
DOI: 10.1128/jcm.02555-20
Part of ISSN: 0095-1137
Part of ISSN: 1098-660X
Authors:
Date:
2022-03-01
Journal:
Journal of Agriculture and Food Research
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Marcel N. Moyeh , author
Dieudonne L. Njimoh , author
Marie Solange Evehe , author
Innocent M. Ali , author
Akindeh M. Nji , author
Dominique N. Nkafu , author
Palmer N. Masumbe , author
Atogho-Tiedeu Barbara , author
Valentine N. Ndikum , author
Wilfred F. Mbacham , author
Date:
2018-05-02
Journal:
Malaria Research and Treatment
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Ali IM , author
Evehe MS , author
Netongo PM , author
Atogho-Tiedeu B , author
Akindeh-Nji M , author
Ngora H , author
Domkam IK , author
Diakite M , author
Baldip K , author
Ranford-Cartwright L , author
Mimche PN , author
Lamb T , author
Mbacham WF , author
Date:
2014-10-01
Journal:
Pathogens and global health
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Atem Bethel Ajong , author
Frank T. Spradley , editor
Bruno Kenfack , author
Innocent Mbulli Ali , author
Martin Ndinakie Yakum , author
Ukaogo Prince Onydinma , author
Fulbert Nkwele Mangala , author
Loai Aljerf , author
Phelix Bruno Telefo , author
Date:
2022-05-18
Journal:
PLOS ONE
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Adamu Ndongho Ndifontiayong , author
Innocent Mbulli Ali , author
Jean Baptiste Sokoudjou , author
Jerimiah Mbogwe Ndimumeh , author
Christopher Bonglavnyuy Tume , author
Date:
2021-08-10
Journal:
Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Karimo Ousenu , author
Leonard Fonkeng Sama , author
Innocent Mbulli Ali , author
Jude Leinyuy Fonbah , author
Ongbayokolak Sylvie Nadine , author
Solange Dabou , author
Christopher Tume , author
Date:
2021-09-01
Journal:
BMJ Open
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Wam EC , author
Sama LF , author
Ali IM , author
Ebile WA , author
Aghangu LA , author
Tume CB , author
Date:
2016-08-01
Journal:
BMC research notes
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Marcel N. Moyeh , author
Innocent M. Ali , author
Dieudonné L. Njimoh , author
Akindeh M. Nji , author
Palmer M. Netongo , author
Marie S. Evehe , author
Barbara Atogho-Tiedeu , author
Stephen M. Ghogomu , author
Wilfred F. Mbacham , author
Date:
2019-03-10
Journal:
Journal of Parasitology Research
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Atem Bethel Ajong , author
Bruno Kenfack , author
Innocent Mbulli Ali , author
Martin Ndinakie Yakum , author
Phelix Bruno Telefo , author
Frank T. Spradley , editor
Date:
2019-11-07
Journal:
PLOS ONE
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Ali IM , author
Bigoga JD , author
Forsah DA , author
Cho-Ngwa F , author
Tchinda V , author
Moor VA , author
Fogako J , author
Nyongalema P , author
Nkoa T , author
Same-Ekobo A , author
Mbede J , author
Fondjo E , author
Mbacham WF , author
Leke RG , author
Date:
2016-01-01
Journal:
Malaria journal
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Nji AM , author
Ali IM , author
Moyeh MN , author
Ngongang EO , author
Ekollo AM , author
Chedjou JP , author
Ndikum VN , author
Evehe MS , author
Froeschl G , author
Heumann C , author
Mansmann U , author
Ogundahunsi O , author
Mbacham WF , author
Date:
2015-01-01
Journal:
Malaria journal
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Takah NF , author
Awungafac G , author
Aminde LN , author
Ali I , author
Ndasi J , author
Njukeng P , author
Date:
2016-07-01
Journal:
BMC public health
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2021-10-24
Journal:
Children
Content:
Malaria is still a threat to public health as it remains the first endemic disease in the world. It is a pervasive parasitic disease in tropical and subtropical regions where asymptomatic malaria infection among humans serves as a significant reservoir for transmission. A rapid and correct diagnosis is considered to be an important strategy in the control of the disease especially in children, who are the most vulnerable group. This study assessed the prevalence of asymptomatic malaria in children at the Nkolbisson health area in Yaoundé, Cameroon. A cross-sectional study design and a convenience sampling plan were used. A total of 127 participants were recruited after informed and signed consent from parents and/or guardians. Blood samples were collected by finger-pricking and venipuncture from children aged 6 months to 10 years and then screened for asymptomatic parasitemia by a rapid diagnostic test (RDT), light microscopy (LM) staining with Giemsa and 18S rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for speciation. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 software. The study identified 85 children who were positive from the PCR, 95 positive from the RDT and 71 from the LM, revealing a malaria prevalence of 66.9%, 74.8% and 55.9%, respectively. The prevalence was not observed to be dependent on the sex and age group of the participants. Plasmodium falciparum was the predominant species followed by Plasmodium malariae and then Plasmodium ovale. The RDT and LM had the same sensitivity (90.6%) with a slight difference in their specificity (RDT: 57.1%; LM: 54.8%). The RDT also demonstrated higher positive and negative predictive values compared with those of the LM.
Identifiers:
DOI: 10.3390/children8110960
Part of ISSN: 2227-9067
Authors:
Date:
2021-08-27
Journal:
Diagnostics
Content:
Background: There was an increase in the number of malaria cases in Cameroon in 2018 that could reflect changes in provider practice, despite effective interventions. In this study, we assessed the diagnostic performance of two malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs) for diagnostic confirmation of suspected cases of malaria in public and private health facilities in two malaria transmission settings in Cameroon. Methods: We evaluated the diagnostic performance of CareStart pf and SD Bioline Pf/PAN mRDT and compared these parameters by RDT type and transmission setting. Nested PCR and blood film microscopy were used as references. The chi square test was used for independent sample comparisons, while the McNemar’s test was used to test for the dependence of categorical data in paired sample testing. A p < 0.05 was considered significant in all comparisons. The R (v.4.0.2) software was used for analyses. Results: A total of 1126 participants consented for the study in the four sites. The diagnostic accuracy of the CareStart Pf mRDT was 0.93.6% (0.911–0.961) in Yaoundé, 0.930% (0.90–0.960) in Ngounso, 0.84% (0.794–0.891) in St Vincent Catholic Hospital Dschang and 0.407 (0.345–0.468) in Dschang district hospital. For SD Bioline Pf/PAN the accuracy was 0.759 (0.738–0.846) for St Vincent Catholic Hospital Dschang and 0.426 (0.372–0.496) for the Dschang district hospital. The accuracy was slightly lower in each case but not statistically different when PCR was considered as the reference. The likelihood ratios of the positive and negative tests were high in the high transmission settings of Yaoundé (10.99 (6.24–19.35)) and Ngounso (14.40 (7.89–26.28)) compared to the low transmission settings of Dschang (0.71 (0.37–1.37)) and St Vincent Catholic hospital (7.37 (4.32−12.59)). There was a high degree of agreement between the tests in Yaoundé (Cohen’s Kappa: 0.85 ± 0.05 (0.7–0.95)) and Ngounso (Cohen’s Kappa: 0.86 ± 0.05 (0.74, 0.97)) and moderate agreement in St Vincent hospital Dschang (k: 0.58 ± 0.06 (0.44–0.71)) and poor agreement in the District Hospital Dschang (Cohen’s Kappa: −0.11 ± 0.05 (−0.21–0.01)). The diagnostic indicators of the SD Bioline Pf/PAN were slightly better than for CareStart Pf mRDT in St Vincent Catholic hospital Dschang, irrespective of the reference test. Conclusions: Publicly procured malaria rapid diagnostic tests in Cameroon have maintained high accuracy (91–94%) in the clinical diagnosis of malaria in high malaria transmission regions of Cameroon, although they failed to reach WHO standards. We observed an exception in the low transmission region of Dschang, West region, where the accuracy tended to be lower and variable between facilities located in this town. These results underscore the importance of the routine monitoring of the quality and performance of malaria RDTs in diverse settings in malaria endemic areas.
Identifiers:
Authors:
Cliford Ebontane Ebong , author
Innocent Mbulli Ali , author
Hortence Jeanne Fouedjio , author
Estelle Essangui , author
Dorothy Fosah Achu , author
Ayong Lawrence , author
Dohbit Sama , author
Date:
2022-12-01
Journal:
Malaria Journal
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2013-06-28
Journal:
Journal of Life Sciences
Content:
Identifiers:
DOI: 10.17265/1934-7391/2013.06.006
Part of ISSN: 1934-7391
Part of ISSN: 1934-7391
Authors:
Karimo Ousenu , author
Innocent Mbulli Ali , author
Leonard Fonkeng Sama , author
Marcel Nsangou Ndam , author
Thibau Florant Tchouangueu , author
Christopher Bonglavnyuy Tume , author
Maria De Francesco , editor
Date:
2021-08-07
Journal:
Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases and Medical Microbiology
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Atem Bethel Ajong , author
Frank T. Spradley , editor
Bruno Kenfack , author
Innocent Mbulli Ali , author
Martin Ndinakie Yakum , author
Loai Aljerf , author
Phelix Bruno Telefo , author
Date:
2020-11-05
Journal:
PLOS ONE
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2017-05-13
Journal:
Global Journal of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Research
Content:
Identifiers:

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