EDCTP Alumni Network

Fostering excellence and collaboration in the next generation of researchers

Call Career Development Fellowship (CDF)
Programme EDCTP2
Start Date 2019-09-01
End Date 2022-08-31
Project Code TMA2018CDF-2397
Status Active

Title

Operational feasibility, impact of additional screening using highly-sensitives Rapid Diagnostic Tests combined with high coverage of IPTp-SP on placental malaria and low birth weight (ASSER Malaria)

Host Organisation

Institution Country
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique et Technologique (CNRST) - Institut de Recherche en Science de la Santé (IRSS) Burkina Faso

Current Organisation

Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro/IRSS-DRCO/CNRST

Current Job Title

Research Associate

Awards

2020 Small Grant Foundation Mérieux (Malaria in Pregnancy at first ANC)

Students Supervised

Type Name Title University Start Date End Date
Medical Doctor Sanou Hyacinthe Université Ouaga 1 Joseph Ki-Zerbo 2020

Education

Institution Degree Year
University of Ouaga 1, Burkina Faso Doctor in Pharmacy 2005-06-30
Polytechnic University of Bobo, Burkina Faso Master in Applied Biology and Modelling of Biological Systems 2008-06-30
University of Antwerp, Belgium PhD in Medical Sciences 2017-05-09
UKAS, United Kingdom Auditor ISO 15189 2020-09-17
Fondation Mérieux, France Expert in Clinical Lab Quality Management 2021-02-09

Areas Of Specialisation

Malaria Neglected Infectious Diseases (NID) Lower Respiratory Tract Infections (LRTIs) Diarrhoeal Diseases (DDs)

Publications

Authors:
Date:
2014-05-01
Journal:
Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Content:
Identifiers:
DOI: 10.1128/jcm.02297-13
Part of ISSN: 0095-1137
Authors:
Date:
2016-03-04
Journal:
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2007-04-01
Journal:
Emerging Infectious Diseases
Content:
Identifiers:
DOI: 10.3201/eid1304.061356
Part of ISSN: 1080-6040
Part of ISSN: 1080-6059
Authors:
Date:
2016-04-27
Journal:
mSphere
Content:
ABSTRACT Burkholderia pseudomallei , an environmental bacterium that causes the deadly disease melioidosis, is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia. An increasing number of melioidosis cases are being reported in other tropical regions, including Africa and the Indian Ocean islands. B. pseudomallei first emerged in Australia, with subsequent rare dissemination event(s) to Southeast Asia; however, its dispersal to other regions is not yet well understood. We used large-scale comparative genomics to investigate the origins of three B. pseudomallei isolates from Madagascar and two from Burkina Faso. Phylogenomic reconstruction demonstrates that these African B. pseudomallei isolates group into a single novel clade that resides within the more ancestral Asian clade. Intriguingly, South American strains reside within the African clade, suggesting more recent dissemination from West Africa to the Americas. Anthropogenic factors likely assisted in B. pseudomallei dissemination to Africa, possibly during migration of the Austronesian peoples from Indonesian Borneo to Madagascar ~2,000 years ago, with subsequent genetic diversity driven by mutation and recombination. Our study provides new insights into global patterns of B. pseudomallei dissemination and adds to the growing body of evidence of melioidosis endemicity in Africa. Our findings have important implications for melioidosis diagnosis and management in Africa. IMPORTANCE Sporadic melioidosis cases have been reported in the African mainland and Indian Ocean islands, but until recently, these regions were not considered areas where B. pseudomallei is endemic. Given the high mortality rate of melioidosis, it is crucial that this disease be recognized and suspected in all regions of endemicity. Previous work has shown that B. pseudomallei originated in Australia, with subsequent introduction into Asia; however, the precise origin of B. pseudomallei in other tropical regions remains poorly understood. Using whole-genome sequencing, we characterized B. pseudomallei isolates from Madagascar and Burkina Faso. Next, we compared these strains to a global collection of B. pseudomallei isolates to identify their evolutionary origins. We found that African B. pseudomallei strains likely originated from Asia and were closely related to South American strains, reflecting a relatively recent shared evolutionary history. We also identified substantial genetic diversity among African strains, suggesting long-term B. pseudomallei endemicity in this region.
Identifiers:
DOI: 10.1128/msphere.00089-15
Part of ISSN: 2379-5042
Authors:
Date:
2017-07-28
Journal:
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2019-10-14
Journal:
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Kattenberg JH , author
Tahita CM , author
Versteeg IA , author
Tinto H , author
Traoré-Coulibaly M , author
Schallig HD , author
Mens PF , author
Date:
2012-05-01
Journal:
Tropical medicine & international health : TM & IH
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2016-02-29
Journal:
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2013-12-01
Journal:
BMC Infectious Diseases
Content:
Identifiers:
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-13-164
Part of ISSN: 1471-2334
Authors:
Date:
2014-03-22
Journal:
Malaria journal
Content:
BACKGROUND: The opportunities for developing new drugs and vaccines for malaria control look brighter now than ten years ago. However, there are few places in sub-Saharan Africa with the necessary infrastructure and expertise to support such research in compliance to international standards of clinical research (ICH-GCP). The Clinical Research Unit of Nanoro (CRUN) was founded in 2008 to provide a much-needed GCP-compliant clinical trial platform for an imminent large-scale Phase 3 malaria vaccine trial. A dynamic approach was used that entailed developing the required infrastructure and human resources, while engaging local communities in the process as key stakeholders. This provided a better understanding and ownership of the research activities by the local population. CASE DESCRIPTION: Within five years (2008-2013), the CRUN set up a fully and well-equipped GCP-compliant clinical trial research facility, which enabled to attract 25 grants. The research team grew from ten health workers prior to 2008 to 254 in 2013. A Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS), which covers a total population of about 60,000 people in 24 villages was set up in the district. The local community contributed to the development of the facility through the leadership of the king and the mayor of Nanoro. As a result of their active advocacy, the government extended the national electrical grid to the new research center, and later to the entire village. This produced a positive impact on the community's quality of life. The quality of health care improved substantially, due to the creation of more elaborate clinical laboratory services and the acquisition of state-of-the-art equipment. CONCLUSION: Involving the community in the key steps of establishing the centre provided the foundation for what was to become the CRUN success story. This experience demonstrates that when clinical trials research sites are carefully developed and implemented, they can have a positive and powerful impact on local communities in resource-poor settings, well beyond the task of generating expected study data.
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2019-12-01
Journal:
Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
Content:
Identifiers:
Authors:
Date:
2018-12-01
Journal:
Infectious Diseases of Poverty
Content:
Identifiers:

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